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Citações ao PRODES Amazônia

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2019 *

  1. SOLTANGHEISI, A. et al. Forest conversion to pasture affects soil phosphorus dynamics and nutritional status in Brazilian Amazon. Soil and Tillage Research, v. 194, p. 104330, nov. 2019.
  2. DALDEGAN, G. A.; ROBERTS, D. A.; RIBEIRO, F. DE F. Spectral mixture analysis in Google Earth Engine to model and delineate fire scars over a large extent and a long time-series in a rainforest-savanna transition zone. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 232, p. 111340, out. 2019.
  3. PARENTE, L. et al. Assessing the pasturelands and livestock dynamics in Brazil, from 1985 to 2017: A novel approach based on high spatial resolution imagery and Google Earth Engine cloud computing. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 232, p. 111301, out. 2019.
  4. ESCOBAR, H. Brazilian president attacks deforestation data. Science, v.365, n. 6452, p. 419–419, 2 ago. 2019.
  5. SATHLER, D. et al. Assessing the regional context of migration in the Brazilian Amazon through spatial regression modeling. Applied Geography, v. 109, p. 102042, ago. 2019.
  6. VALLE, D.; KAPLAN, D. Quantifying the impacts of dams on riverine hydrology under non-stationary conditions using incomplete data and Gaussian copula models. Science of The Total Environment, v. 677, p. 599–611, ago. 2019.
  7. HOCHSTETLER, K.; INOUE, C. Y. A. South-South relations and global environmental governance: Brazilian international development cooperation. Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional, v. 62, n. 2, p. e004, 31 jul. 2019.
  8. FAN, L. et al. Satellite-observed pantropical carbon dynamics. Nature Plants, 29 jul. 2019.
  9. HRYCYNA, G.; MARTINS, A. C. M.; GRACIOLLI, G. Infracommunities of bat flies (Diptera: Streblidae and Nycteribiidae) of bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) in three conservation units in the State of Amapá, Brazil. Biota Neotropica, v. 19, n. 4, p. e20180715, 29 jul. 2019.
  10. QIN, Y. et al. Improved estimates of forest cover and loss in the Brazilian Amazon in 2000–2017. Nature Sustainability, 29 jul. 2019.
  11. SOTERRONI, A. C. et al. Expanding the Soy Moratorium to Brazil’s Cerrado. Science Advances, v. 5, n. 7, p. eaav7336, 17 jul. 2019.
  12. FONSECA, M. G. et al. Effects of climate and land‐use change scenarios on fire probability during the 21st century in the Brazilian Amazon. Global Change Biology, p. gcb.14709, 15 jul. 2019.
  13. HERRERA, D.; PFAFF, A.; ROBALINO, J. Impacts of protected areas vary with the level of government: Comparing avoided deforestation across agencies in the Brazilian Amazon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, p. 201802877, 8 jul. 2019.
  14. FORTIN, J. A.; CARDILLE, J. A.; PEREZ, E. Multi-sensor detection of forest-cover change across 45 years in Mato Grosso, Brazil. Remote Sensing of Environment, p. 111266, 8 jul. 2019.
  15. PÖHLKER, C. et al. Land cover and its transformation in the backward trajectory footprint region of the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, v. 19, n. 13, p. 8425–8470, 3 jul. 2019.
  16. GOMES, V. H. F. et al. Amazonian tree species threatened by deforestation and climate change. Nature Climate Change, v. 9, n. 7, p. 547–553, 1 jul. 2019.
  17. VALE, P. et al. The expansion of intensive beef farming to the Brazilian Amazon. Global Environmental Change, v. 57, p. 101922, jul. 2019.
  18. VAN DER HOFF, R.; RAJÃO, R.; LEROY, P. Can REDD+ still become a market? Ruptured dependencies and market logics for emission reductions in Brazil. Ecological Economics, v. 161, p. 121–129, jul. 2019.
  19. CARVALHO, W. D. et al. Deforestation control in the Brazilian Amazon: A conservation struggle being lost as agreements and regulations are subverted and bypassed. Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation, p. S2530064418301263, 29 jun. 2019.
  20. BRITO, B. et al. Stimulus for land grabbing and deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Environmental Research Letters, 21. jun. 2019.
  21. KLARENBERG, G. et al. A spatiotemporal natural-human database to evaluate road development impacts in an Amazon trinational frontier. Scientific Data, v. 6, n. 1, p. 93, 17 jun. 2019.
  22. FIGUEIREDO, V.; ENRICH-PRAST, A.; RÜTTING, T. Evolution of nitrogen cycling in regrowing Amazonian rainforest. Scientific Reports, v. 9, n. 1, p. 8538, 12 jun. 2019.
  23. ABE, C. A. et al. Modeling the effects of land cover change on sediment concentrations in a gold-mined Amazonian basin. Regional Environmental Change, 1 jun. 2019.
  24. AMARAL, S. S. et al. CO2, CO, hydrocarbon gases and PM2.5 emissions on dry season by deforestation fires in the Brazilian Amazonia. Environmental Pollution, v. 249, p. 311–320, jun. 2019.
  25. CROWSON, M.; HAGENSIEKER, R.; WASKE, B. Mapping land cover change in northern Brazil with limited training data. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, v. 78, p. 202–214, jun. 2019.
  26. DA SILVA, H. J. F.; GONÇALVES, W. A.; BEZERRA, B. G. Comparative analyzes and use of evapotranspiration obtained through remote sensing to identify deforested areas in the Amazon. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, v. 78, p. 163–174, jun. 2019.
  27. SGARBI, F. DE A. et al. An assessment of the socioeconomic externalities of hydropower plants in Brazil. Energy Policy, v. 129, p. 868–879, jun. 2019.
  28. ZENI, J. O. et al. How deforestation drives stream habitat changes and the functional structure of fish assemblages in different tropical regions. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems, p. aqc.3128, 30 maio 2019.
  29. MILHORANCE, C.; BURSZTYN, M. Climate adaptation and policy conflicts in the Brazilian Amazon: prospects for a Nexus + approach. Climatic Change, 29 maio 2019.
  30. NASCIMENTO, N. et al. What drives intensification of land use at agricultural frontiers in the Brazilian Amazon? Evidence from a decision game. Forests, v. 10, n. 6, p. 464, 29 maio 2019.
  31. ESPADA, A. L. V.; SOBRINHO, M. V. Logging community-based forests in the Amazon: an analysis of external influences, multi-partner governance, and resilience. Forests, v. 10, n. 6, p. 461, 28 maio 2019.
  32. PEREIRA, J. C.; VIOLA, E. Catastrophic climate risk and Brazilian Amazonian politics and policies: a new research agenda. Global Environmental Politics, v. 19, n. 2, p. 93–103, 28 maio 2019.
  33. HASAN, A. F. et al. Cumulative disturbances to assess forest degradation using spectral unmixing in the north‐eastern Amazon. Applied Vegetation Science, p. avsc.12441, 20 maio 2019.
  34. MIRANDA, E. B. P. et al. Species distribution modeling reveals strongholds and potential reintroduction areas for the world’s largest eagle. PLOS ONE, v. 14, n. 5, p. e0216323, 13 maio 2019.
  35. LATHUILLIÈRE, M. J.; BULLE, C.; JOHNSON, M. S. Complementarity in mid-point impacts for water use in life cycle assessment applied to cropland and cattle production in Southern Amazonia. Journal of Cleaner Production, v. 219, p. 497–507, 10 maio 2019.
  36. BARBOSA, R. I. et al. Allometric models to estimate tree height in northern Amazonian ecotone forests. Acta Amazonica, v. 49, n. 2, p. 81–90, 6 maio 2019.
  37. GEBARA. M. F. Understanding institutional bricolage: What drives behavior change towards sustainable land use in the Eastern Amazon? International Journal of the Commons, v. 3, n. 1, p. 637–659, 6 mai. 2019.
  38. CARVALHO, R. et al. Changes in secondary vegetation dynamics in a context of decreasing deforestation rates in Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Applied Geography, v. 106, p. 40–49, maio 2019.
  39. MERCURE, J.-F. et al. System complexity and policy integration challenges: The Brazilian Energy- Water-Food Nexus. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, v. 105, p. 230–243, maio 2019.
  40. MÜLLER-HANSEN, F. et al. Can intensification of cattle ranching reduce deforestation in the Amazon? Insights from an agent-based social-ecological model. Ecological Economics, v. 159, p. 198–211, maio 2019.
  41. BUSTAMANTE, M. M. C. et al. Ecological restoration as a strategy for mitigating and adapting to climate change: lessons and challenges from Brazil. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, 25 abr. 2019.
  42. SOUZA, L. B. E; BARROS, J. R. Agronegócio e ambiente no Cerrado tocantinense: um panorama dos municípios com base em indicadores. Ateliê Geográfico, v. 13, n. 1, 20 abr. 2019.
  43. DA SILVA, S. R. S. et al. The Paris pledges and the energy-water-land nexus in Latin America: Exploring implications of greenhouse gas emission reductions. PLOS ONE, v. 14, n. 4, p. e0215013, 16 abr. 2019.
  44. MIRANDA, L. S.; IMPERATRIZ-FONSECA, V. L.; GIANNINI, T. C. Climate change impact on ecosystem functions provided by birds in southeastern Amazonia. PLOS ONE, v. 14, n. 4, p. e0215229, 11 abr. 2019.
  45. SCARANELLO, M. A. S. et al. Estimation of coarse woody debris stocks in intact and degraded forests in the Brazilian Amazon using airborne lidar. Biogeosciences Discussions, p. 1–33, 8 abr. 2019.
  46. ALBUQUERQUE, F. L. Coalition Making and Norm Shaping in Brazil’s Foreign Policy in the Climate Change Regime. Global Society, v. 33, n. 2, p. 243–261, 3 abr. 2019.
  47. ABESSA, D.; FAMÁ, A.; BURUAEM, L. The systematic dismantling of Brazilian environmental laws risks losses on all fronts. Nature Ecology & Evolution, v. 3, n. 4, p. 510–511, 1 abr. 2019.
  48. KOCH, N. et al. Agricultural productivity and forest conservation: evidence from the Brazilian Amazon. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, v. 101, n. 3, p. 919–940, 1 abr. 2019.
  49. COSTA, O. B. DA et al. Selective Logging Detection in the Brazilian Amazon. Floresta e Ambiente, v. 26, n. 2, 4 abr. 2019.
  50. MIRANDA, J. et al. Land speculation and conservation policy leakage in Brazil. Environmental Research Letters, v. 14, n. 4, p. 045006, 2 abr. 2019.
  51. KISSINGER, G. et al. Climate financing needs in the land sector under the Paris Agreement: An assessment of developing country perspectives. Land Use Policy, v. 83, p. 256–269, abr. 2019.
  52. VIRAH-SAWMY, M. et al. Sustainability gridlock in a global agricultural commodity chain: Reframing the soy–meat food system. Sustainable Production and Consumption, v. 18, p. 210–223, abr. 2019.
  53. CAMPANHARO, W. et al. Translating Fire Impacts in Southwestern Amazonia into Economic Costs. Remote Sensing, v. 11, n. 7, p. 764, 29 mar. 2019.
  54. FARIA, W. R.; BETARELLI JÚNIOR, A. A.; MONTENEGRO, R. L. G. Multidimensional characteristics and deforestation: an analysis for the Brazilian Legal Amazon. Quality & Quantity, 27 mar. 2019.
  55. CORREA, J.; VAN DER HOFF, R.; RAJÃO, R. Amazon Fund 10 Years Later: Lessons from the World’s Largest REDD+ Program. Forests, v. 10, n. 3, p. 272, 19 mar. 2019.
  56. SOUZA, C. et al. Long-term annual surface water change in the Brazilian Amazon biome: potential links with deforestation, infrastructure development and climate change. Water, v. 11, n. 3, p. 566, 19 mar. 2019.
  57. GALUCHI, T. P. D.; ROSALES, F. P.; BATALHA, M. O. Management of socioenvironmental factors of reputational risk in the beef supply chain in the Brazilian Amazon region. International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, v. 22, n. 2, p. 155–171, 13 mar. 2019.
  58. RESQUE, A. L. et al. Agrobiodiversity and public food procurement programs in Brazil: influence of local stakeholders in configuring green mediated markets. Sustainability, v. 11, n. 5, p. 1425, 7 mar. 2019.
  59. DE LA VEGA-LEINERT, A. C.; HUBER, C. The Down Side of Cross-Border Integration: The Case of Deforestation in the Brazilian Mato Grosso and Bolivian Santa Cruz Lowlands. Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development, v. 61, n. 2, p. 31–44, 4 mar. 2019.
  60. MAYES, D. M. et al. Body Size Influences Stingless Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Communities Across a Range of Deforestation Levels in Rondônia, Brazil. Journal of Insect Science, v. 19, n. 2, 1 mar. 2019.
  61. BOUBLI, J. P. et al. On a new species of titi monkey (Primates: Plecturocebus Byrne et al., 2016), from Alta Floresta, southern Amazon, Brazil. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, v. 132, p. 117–137, 2019.
  62. LIMA, M. et al. Demystifying sustainable soy in Brazil. Land Use Policy, v. 82, p. 349–352, mar. 2019.
  63. NUNES, S. et al. Uncertainties in assessing the extent and legal compliance status of riparian forests in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. Land Use Policy, v. 82, p. 37–47, mar. 2019.
  64. OLIVEIRA, A. S. et al. Economic losses to sustainable timber production by fire in the Brazilian Amazon. The Geographical Journal, v. 185, n. 1, p. 55–67, mar. 2019.
  65. RODRIGUES, M. G. DE A. et al. The role of deforestation on American cutaneous leishmaniasis incidence: spatial‐temporal distribution, environmental and socioeconomic factors associated in the Brazilian Amazon. Tropical Medicine & International Health, v. 24, n. 3, p. 348–355, mar. 2019.
  66. SILVA, F. DE F.; PERRIN, R. K.; FULGINITI, L. E. The opportunity cost of preserving the Brazilian Amazon forest. Agricultural Economics, v. 50, n. 2, p. 219–227, mar. 2019.
  67. SILVÉRIO, D. V. et al. Fire, fragmentation, and windstorms: A recipe for tropical forest degradation. Journal of Ecology, v. 107, n. 2, p. 656–667, mar. 2019.
  68. SANTOS, H. L. et al. Rattlesnakes bites in the Brazilian Amazon: Clinical epidemiology, spatial distribution and ecological determinants. Acta Tropica, v. 191, p. 69–76, mar. 2019.
  69. MARQUES, E. Q. et al. Redefining the Cerrado–Amazonia transition: implications for conservation. Biodiversity and Conservation, 25 fev. 2019.
  70. DALMAGRO, H. et al. Streams with Riparian Forest Buffers versus Impoundments Differ in Discharge and DOM Characteristics for Pasture Catchments in Southern Amazonia. Water, v. 11, n. 2, p. 390, 23 fev. 2019.
  71. SCHMINK, M. et al. From contested to ‘green’ frontiers in the Amazon? A long-term analysis of São Félix do Xingu, Brazil. The Journal of Peasant Studies, v. 46, n. 2, p. 377–399, 23 fev. 2019.
  72. SHIMABUKURO, Y. E. et al. Monitoring deforestation and forest degradation using multi-temporal fraction images derived from Landsat sensor data in the Brazilian Amazon. International Journal of Remote Sensing, p. 1–22, 17 fev. 2019.
  73. SANO, E. E. et al. Cerrado ecoregions: A spatial framework to assess and prioritize Brazilian savanna environmental diversity for conservation. Journal of Environmental Management, v. 232, p. 818–828, 15 fev. 2019.
  74. FAGUA, J. C.; RAMSEY, R. D. Geospatial modeling of land cover change in the Chocó-Darien global ecoregion of South America; One of most biodiverse and rainy areas in the world. PLOS ONE, v. 14, n. 2, p. e0211324, 1 fev. 2019.
  75. KHAN, M. A. W. et al. Deforestation impacts network co-occurrence patterns of microbial communities in Amazon soils. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, v. 95, n. 2, 1 fev. 2019.
  76. HETHCOAT, M. G. et al. A machine learning approach to map tropical selective logging. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 221, p. 569–582, fev 2019.
  77. GALLO, P.; ALBRECHT, E. Brazil and the Paris Agreement: REDD+ as an instrument of Brazil’s Nationally Determined Contribution compliance. International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, v. 19, n. 1, p. 123–144, fev. 2019.
  78. PFLUGMACHER, D. et al. Mapping pan-European land cover using Landsat spectral-temporal metrics and the European LUCAS survey. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 221, p. 583–595, fev. 2019.
  79. PICKERING, J. et al. Quantifying the trade-off between cost and precision in estimating area of forest loss and degradation using probability sampling in Guyana. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 221, p. 122–135, fev. 2019.
  80. SMITH, V. et al. Assessing the accuracy of detected breaks in Landsat time series as predictors of small scale deforestation in tropical dry forests of Mexico and Costa Rica. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 221, p. 707–721, fev. 2019.
  81. THALER, G. M.; VIANA, C.; TONI, F. From frontier governance to governance frontier: The political geography of Brazil’s Amazon transition. World Development, v. 114, p. 59–72, fev. 2019.
  82. WANG, Y. et al. Mapping tropical disturbed forests using multi-decadal 30 m optical satellite imagery. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 221, p. 474–488, fev. 2019.
  83. LE CLEC’H, S. et al. Uncertainty in ecosystem services maps: the case of carbon stocks in the Brazilian Amazon forest using regression analysis. One Ecosystem, v. 4, 31 jan. 2019.
  84. DAYRELL, C. Discourses around climate change in Brazilian newspapers: 2003–2013. Discourse & Communication, v. 13, n. 2, p. 149–171, 30 jan. 2019.
  85. ASSUNÇÃO, J.; ROCHA, R. Getting greener by going black: the effect of blacklisting municipalities on Amazon deforestation. Environment and Development Economics, v. 24, n. 2, p. 115–137, 25 jan. 2019.
  86. MARCOVITCH, J.; C. PINSKY, V. Un retrato de la Amazonia planetaria. Revista de estudios brasileños, v. 6, n. 11, p. 169, 25 jan. 2019.
  87. CONDÉ, T. M.; HIGUCHI, N.; J. N. LIMA, A. Illegal Selective Logging and Forest Fires in the Northern Brazilian Amazon. Forests, v. 10, n. 1, p. 61, 14 jan. 2019.
  88. SIMMONS, C. S. et al. Discipline and develop: destruction of the Brazil nut forest in the lower Amazon basin. Annals of the American Association of Geographers, v. 109, n. 1, p. 242–265, 2 jan. 2019.
  89. AMIN, A. et al. Neighborhood effects in the Brazilian Amazônia: Protected areas and deforestation. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, v. 93, p. 272–288, jan. 2019.
  90. ARÉVALO, P.; OLOFSSON, P.; WOODCOCK, C. E. Continuous monitoring of land change activities and post-disturbance dynamics from Landsat time series: A test methodology for REDD+ reporting. Remote Sensing of Environment, jan. 2019.
  91. LIMA, M. et al. The paradoxical situation of the white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation, v. 17, n. 1, p. 36–39, jan. 2019.
  92. VON RANDOW, R. C. S. et al. Response of the river discharge in the Tocantins River Basin, Brazil, to environmental changes and the associated effects on the energy potential. Regional Environmental Change, v. 19, n. 1, p. 193–204, jan. 2019.
  93. AMORIM, T. X.; SENNA, M. C. A.; CATALDI, M. Impactos do desmatamento progressivo da Amazônia na precipitação do Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Climatologia 24, v. 24, 2019.
  94. CAPOBIANCO, J. P. R. Avances y retrocesos de la sostenibilidad en la Amazonia: un análisis de la gobernanza socioambiental en la Amazonia. Revista de estudios brasileños, v. 6, n. 11, p. 61–78, 2019.
  95. DA CRUZ, D. C. et al. Evaluation of soil erosion process and conservation practices in the Paragominas-PA municipality (Brazil). Geographia Technica, v. 14, n. 1, p. 14–35, 2019.
  96. KINYEMI, J.; MOTHE, J.; NEPTUNE, N. Jeux de Données d’Observation de la Terre pour la Détection des Changements dans les Forêts. Information Retrieval, Document and Semantic Web, v. 19, n. 1, 2019.
  97. CANELAS, T. et al. Environmental and socioeconomic analysis of malaria transmission in the Brazilian Amazon, 2010–2015. Revista de Saúde Pública, v. 53, n. 49, 2019.

 

2018

Voltar ao topo

  1. ABE, C. A. et al. Modelling the effects of historical and future land cover changes on the hydrology of an Amazonian basin. Water (Switzerland), v. 10, n. 7, 2018.
  2. ABRAHAMS, M. I.; PERES, C. A.; COSTA, H. C. M. Manioc losses by terrestrial vertebrates in western Brazilian Amazonia. Journal of Wildlife Management, v. 82, n. 4, p. 734–746, 2018.
  3. AHMED, S. et al. Fruit and vegetable desirability is lower in more rural built food environments of Montana, USA using the Produce Desirability (ProDes) Tool. Food Security, v. 10, n. 1, p. 169–182, 2018.
  4. ALCÂNTARA, J. A. et al. Stepping into a dangerous quagmire: Macroecological determinants of Bothrops envenomings, Brazilian Amazon. PLoS ONE, v. 13, n. 12, 2018.
  5. ALEIXANDRE-BENAVENT, R. et al. Trends in global research in deforestation. A bibliometric analysis. Land Use Policy, v. 72, p. 293–302, 2018.
  6. ALIX-GARCIA, J. et al. Avoided Deforestation Linked to Environmental Registration of Properties in the Brazilian Amazon. Conservation Letters, v. 11, n. 3, 2018.
  7. ALVES-PINTO, H. N. et al. Economic Impacts of Payments for Environmental Services on Livelihoods of Agro-extractivist Communities in the Brazilian Amazon. Ecological Economics, v. 152, p. 378–388, 2018.
  8. ALVEZ-VALLES, C. M. et al. Palm species richness, latitudinal gradients, sampling effort, and deforestation in the Amazon region. Acta Botanica Brasilica, v. 32, n. 4, p. 527–539, 19 mar. 2018.
  9. ANTENEH, Y. et al. Dynamics of land change: insights from a three-level intensity analysis of the Legedadie-Dire catchments, Ethiopia. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, v. 190, n. 5, 2018.
  10. ANTONGIOVANNI, M.; VENTICINQUE, E. M.; FONSECA, C. R. Fragmentation patterns of the Caatinga drylands. Landscape Ecology, v. 33, n. 8, p. 1353–1367, 2018.
  11. ARAGÃO, L. E. O. C. et al. 21st Century drought-related fires counteract the decline of Amazon deforestation carbon emissions. Nature Communications, v. 9, n. 1, 2018.
  12. ARVOR, D. et al. Combining socioeconomic development with environmental governance in the Brazilian Amazon: the Mato Grosso agricultural frontier at a tipping point. Environment, Development and Sustainability, v. 20, n. 1, p. 1–22, fev. 2018a.
  13. ARVOR, D. et al. Monitoring thirty years of small water reservoirs proliferation in the southern Brazilian Amazon with Landsat time series. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, v. 145, p. 225–237, nov. 2018b.
  14. AZEVEDO-RAMOS, C.; MOUTINHO, P. No man’s land in the Brazilian Amazon: Could undesignated public forests slow Amazon deforestation? Land Use Policy, v. 73, p. 125–127, 2018.
  15. BENAMI, E. et al. Oil palm land conversion in Pará, Brazil, from 2006-2014: Evaluating the 2010 Brazilian Sustainable Palm Oil Production Program. Environmental Research Letters, v. 13, n. 3, 2018.
  16. BENATTI, J. H.; DA CUNHA FISCHER, L. R. New trends in land tenure and environmental regularisation laws in the Brazilian Amazon. Regional Environmental Change, v. 18, n. 1, p. 11–19, 2018.
  17. BERENGUER, E. et al. Seeing the woods through the saplings: Using wood density to assess the recovery of human-modified Amazonian forests. Journal of Ecology, v. 106, n. 6, p. 2190–2203, 2018a.
  18. BERENGUER, E. et al. Tree growth and stem carbon accumulation in human-modified Amazonian forests following drought and fire. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, v. 373, n. 1760, 2018b.
  19. BERGIER, I. et al. Amazon rainforest modulation of water security in the Pantanal wetland. Science of the Total Environment, v. 619–620, p. 1116–1125, 2018.
  20. BOUCHER, D.; CHI, D. Amazon Deforestation in Brazil: What Has Not Happened and How the Global Media Covered It. Tropical Conservation Science, v. 11, p. 194008291879432, jan. 2018.
  21. BOURGOIN, C. et al. The potential of multisource remote sensing for mapping the biomass of a degraded Amazonian forest. Forests, v. 9, n. 6, 2018.
  22. BOURKE, B. P. et al. Exploring malaria vector diversity on the Amazon Frontier 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1108 Medical Microbiology. Malaria Journal, v. 17, n. 1, 2018.
  23. BRANCALION, P. H. S. et al. Fake legal logging in the brazilian amazon. Science Advances, v. 4, n. 8, 2018.
  24. BRANDÃO, F.; DE CASTRO, F.; FUTEMMA, C. Between structural change and local agency in the palm oil sector: Interactions, heterogeneities and landscape transformations in the Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Rural Studies, set. 2018.
  25. BUSTAMANTE, M. M. C. et al. Engagement of scientific community and transparency in C accounting: The Brazilian case for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from land use, land-use change and forestry. Environmental Research Letters, v. 13, n. 5, 2018.
  26. CABRAL, A. I. R. et al. Deforestation pattern dynamics in protected areas of the Brazilian Legal Amazon using remote sensing data. Applied Geography, v. 100, p. 101–115, 2018.
  27. CÂNDIDO, M. E. M. B. et al. Effects of fragments and landscape characteristics on the orchid bee richness (Apidae: Euglossini) in an urban matrix, southwestern Amazonia. Journal of Insect Conservation, v. 22, n. 3–4, p. 475–486, 2018.
  28. CARAUTA, M. et al. Can preferential credit programs speed up the adoption of low-carbon agricultural systems in Mato Grosso, Brazil? Results from bioeconomic microsimulation. Regional Environmental Change, v. 18, n. 1, p. 117–128, 2018.
  29. CASAROLI, D. et al. Rainfall and evapotranspiration patterns in Goiânia, GO [Padrões de Chuva e de Evapotranspiração em Goiânia, GO]. Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia, v. 33, n. 2, p. 247–256, 2018a.
  30. CASAROLI, D. et al. Edaphoclimatic aptitude to african mahogany in Brazil [Aptidão edafoclimática para o mogno-africano no Brasil]. Ciencia Florestal, v. 28, n. 1, p. 357–368, 2018b.
  31. CASSOL, H. L. G. et al. Retrieving Secondary Forest Aboveground Biomass from Polarimetric ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 Data in the Brazilian Amazon. Remote Sensing, v. 11, n. 1, p. 59, 29 dez. 2018.
  32. CELENTANO, D. et al. Desmatamento, degradação e violência no “Mosaico Gurupi” - A região mais ameaçada da Amazônia. Estudos Avancados, v. 32, n. 92, p. 315–339, 2018.
  33. CERRI, C. E. P. et al. Reducing Amazon Deforestation through Agricultural Intensification in the Cerrado for Advancing Food Security and Mitigating Climate Change. Sustainability, v. 10, n. 4, p. 989, 27 mar. 2018.
  34. CHAUDHARI, S. et al. Climate and anthropogenic contributions to the desiccation of the second largest saline lake in the twentieth century. Journal of Hydrology, v. 560, p. 342–353, 2018.
  35. COSTA, W. F. et al. Bat diversity in Carajás National Forest (Eastern Amazon) and potential impacts on ecosystem services under climate change. Biological Conservation, v. 218, p. 200–210, fev. 2018.
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2016

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    2014

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      2013

      Voltar ao topo

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        2012

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        40. HOOGMOED, M. S.; AVILA-PIRES, T. C. S. Inventory of color polymorphism in populations of Dendrobates galactonotus (Anura: Dendrobatidae), a poison frog endemic to Brazil. Phyllomedusa, v. 11, n. 2, p. 95–115, 2012.
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          2011

          Voltar ao topo

          1. ALBRECHT, R. I.; MORALES, C. A.; SILVA DIAS, M. A. F. Electrification of precipitating systems over the Amazon: Physical processes of thunderstorm development. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, v. 116, n. 8, 2011.
          2. ANDERSON, L. O. et al. Fraction images for monitoring intra-annual phenology of different vegetation physiognomies in Amazonia. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 32, n. 2, p. 387–408, 2011.
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          7. ARVOR, D. et al. Classification of MODIS EVI time series for crop mapping in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 32, n. 22, p. 7847–7871, 2011.
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          31. HAYES, N.; RAJÃO, R. Competing institutional logics and sustainable development: the case of geographic information systems in Brazil’s Amazon region. Information Technology for Development, v. 17, n. 1, p. 4–23, jan. 2011.
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          39. MAEDA, E. E. et al. Dynamic modeling of forest conversion: Simulation of past and future scenarios of rural activities expansion in the fringes of the Xingu National Park, Brazilian Amazon. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, v. 13, n. 3, p. 435–446, 2011b.
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          51. RAŠI, R. et al. An automated approach for segmenting and classifying a large sample of multi-date Landsat imagery for pan-tropical forest monitoring. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 115, n. 12, p. 3659–3669, 2011.
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            2010

            Voltar ao topo

            1. ACHARD, F. et al. Estimating tropical deforestation from Earth observation data. Carbon Management, v. 1, n. 2, p. 271–287, 2010.
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            3. ANDERSON, L. O. et al. Remote sensing detection of droughts in Amazonian forest canopies. New Phytologist, v. 187, n. 3, p. 733–750, 2010.
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            10. BÖRNER, J. et al. Direct conservation payments in the Brazilian Amazon: Scope and equity implications. Ecological Economics, v. 69, n. 6, p. 1272–1282, abr. 2010.
            11. BWANGOY, J.-R. B. et al. Wetland mapping in the Congo Basin using optical and radar remotely sensed data and derived topographical indices. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 114, n. 1, p. 73–86, 2010.
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            15. DA SILVA-NUNES, M. Environmental changes impact in malaria transmition and prospects for the disease control in brazilian amazon rural settlements [Impacto de alterações ambientais na transmissão da malária e perspectivas para o controle da doença em áreas de assentamento rural da amazônia brasileira]. Oecologia Australis, v. 14, n. 3, p. 603–622, 2010.
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            18. DE SOUZA, C. R. et al. Forest species behavior in plantations at full sun and secondary forest enrichment strips in the Amazon [Comportamento de espécies florestais em plantios a pleno sol e em faixas de enriquecimento de capoeira na Amazônia]. Acta Amazonica, v. 40, n. 1, p. 127–134, 2010.
            19. DO CARMO, C. N. et al. Association between particulate matter from biomass burning and respiratory diseases in the southern region of the Brazilian Amazon [Associação entre material particulado de queimadas e doenças respiratórias na região sul da Amazônia brasileira]. Revista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health, v. 27, n. 1, p. 10–16, 2010.
            20. EVA, H. et al. Monitoring forest areas from continental to territorial levels using a sample of medium spatial resolution satellite imagery. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, v. 65, n. 2, p. 191–197, 2010.
            21. FERREIRA, N. C.; FERREIRA, L. G.; HUETE, A. R. Assessing the response of the MODIS vegetation indices to landscape disturbance in the forested areas of the legal Brazilian Amazon. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 31, n. 3, p. 745–759, 2010.
            22. FINCO, M. V. A.; DOPPLER, W. Bioenergy and sustainable development: The dilemma of food security and climate change in the Brazilian savannah. Energy for Sustainable Development, v. 14, n. 3, p. 194–199, 2010.
            23. GALFORD, G. L. et al. Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative futures of deforestation and agricultural management in the southern Amazon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v. 107, n. 46, p. 19649–19654, 2010.
            24. GARDA, A. A.; DA SILVA, J. M. C.; BAIÃO., P. C. Biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in the Amazon. Systematics and Biodiversity, v. 8, n. 2, p. 169–175, 2010.
            25. GIBBS, H. K. et al. Tropical forests were the primary sources of new agricultural land in the 1980s and 1990s. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v. 107, n. 38, p. 16732–16737, 2010.
            26. GUERRA, J. B.; MURA, J. C.; DA COSTA FREITAS, C. Discriminating deforestation increment areas in the Amazon rainforest with L band SAR R99B data [Discriminação de incrementos de desflorestamento na Amazônia com dados SAR R99B em banda L]. Acta Amazonica, v. 40, n. 3, p. 557–566, 2010.
            27. GUIMARÃES, R. J. P. S. et al. Evaluation of a linear spectral mixture model and vegetation indices (NDVI and EVI) in a study of schistosomiasis mansoni and Biomphalaria glabrata distribution in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, v. 105, n. 4, p. 512–518, 2010.
            28. HOHNWALD, S. et al. Degraded pasture distribution and woody enrichment strategies for pasture fertility preservation in the bragantina region, north-eastern amazon. Erdkunde, v. 64, n. 1, p. 17–31, 2010.
            29. LACERDA, A. E. B. D.; NIMMO, E. R. Can we really manage tropical forests without knowing the species within? Getting back to the basics of forest management through taxonomy. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 259, n. 5, p. 995–1002, 2010.
            30. LAPOLA, D. M. et al. Indirect land-use changes can overcome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v. 107, n. 8, p. 3388–3393, 2010.
            31. LE PAGE, Y. et al. Modeling fire-driven deforestation potential in Amazonia under current and projected climate conditions. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, v. 115, n. 3, 2010.
            32. LEES, A. C.; PERES, C. A. Habitat and Life History Determinants of Antbird Occurrence in Variable-Sized Amazonian Forest Fragments. Biotropica, v. 42, n. 5, p. 614–621, 2010.
            33. MAIA, S. M. F. et al. Soil organic carbon stock change due to land use activity along the agricultural frontier of the southwestern Amazon, Brazil, between 1970 and 2002. Global Change Biology, v. 16, n. 10, p. 2775–2788, 2010.
            34. MARTINELLI, L. A. et al. Dissolved nitrogen in rivers: Comparing pristine and impacted regions of Brazil [Nitrogênio dissolvido em rios de regiões distintas do Brasil]. Brazilian Journal of Biology, v. 70, n. 3 SUPPL., p. 709–722, 2010.
            35. MAUÉS, M. M.; DE OLIVEIRA, P. E. A. M. Consequences of habitat fragmentation on the reproductive ecology of timber trees in tropical forests, with emphasis at the Amazonia [Conseqüências da fragmentação do habitat na ecologia reprodutiva de espécies arbóreas em florestas tropicais, com ênfase na amazônia]. Oecologia Australis, v. 14, n. 1, p. 238–250, 2010.
            36. MICHALSKI, F. The bush dog Speothos venaticus and short-eared dog Atelocynus microtis in a fragmented landscape in southern Amazonia. ORYX, v. 44, n. 2, p. 300–303, 2010.
            37. MICHALSKI, F.; METZGER, J. P.; PERES, C. A. Rural property size drives patterns of upland and riparian forest retention in a tropical deforestation frontier. Global Environmental Change, v. 20, n. 4, p. 705–712, 2010.
            38. MILNE, E.; CERRI, C. E. P.; CARVALHO, J. L. N. Agricultural expansion in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso; implications for C stocks and greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental Science and Engineering (Subseries: Environmental Science), n. 9783642004926, p. 447–460, 2010.
            39. NUMATA, I. et al. Biomass collapse and carbon emissions from forest fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, v. 115, n. 3, 2010.
            40. OLSON, S. H. et al. Deforestation and malaria in Mâncio Lima county, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, v. 16, n. 7, p. 1108–1115, 2010.
            41. PARRY, L. et al. Drivers of rural exodus from Amazonian headwaters. Population and Environment, v. 32, n. 2, p. 137–176, 2010a.
            42. PARRY, L. et al. Rural-urban migration brings conservation threats and opportunities to Amazonian watersheds. Conservation Letters, v. 3, n. 4, p. 251–259, 2010b.
            43. PEREIRA, A. C.; GAMA, V. F. Anthropization on the Cerrado biome in the Brazilian Uruçuí-Una Ecological Station estimated from orbital images [Antropização do bioma Cerrado na Estação Ecológica Uruçuí-Una estimada a partir de imagens orbitais]. Brazilian Journal of Biology, v. 70, n. 4, p. 969–976, 2010.
            44. PRUDÊNCIO DA SILVA, V. et al. Variability in environmental impacts of Brazilian soybean according to crop production and transport scenarios. Journal of Environmental Management, v. 91, n. 9, p. 1831–1839, 2010.
            45. REGALADO, A. Brazil Says Rate of Deforestation in Amazon Continues to Plunge. Science, v. 329, n. 5997, p. 1270.2-1271, 10 set. 2010.
            46. RICKETTS, T. H. et al. Indigenous lands, protected areas, and slowing climate change. PLoS Biology, v. 8, n. 3, 2010.
            47. RODRIGUEZ, D. A.; TOMASELLA, J.; LINHARES, C. Is the forest conversion to pasture affecting the hydrological response of Amazonian catchments? Signals in the Ji-Paraná Basin. Hydrological Processes, v. 24, n. 10, p. 1254–1269, 2010.
            48. RÖPER, M. 3D-chess in Amazonia: Reducing deforestation in the 21st century [3D-schach in Amazonien: Entwaldungsbekämpfung im 21. jahrhundert]. Geographische Rundschau, v. 62, n. 9, p. 20–26, 2010.
            49. SAITO, C. H.; STEINKE, V. A. Land surface environmental evaluation of the Brazilian territory in the transfrontier hydrological basins [Avaliação geoambiental do território Brasileiro nas bacias hidrográficas transfronteiriças]. Revista Brasileira de Gestao e Desenvolvimento Regional, v. 6, n. 1, p. 189–221, 2010.
            50. SBERZE, M.; COHN-HAFT, M.; FERRAZ, G. Old growth and secondary forest site occupancy by nocturnal birds in a neotropical landscape. Animal Conservation, v. 13, n. 1, p. 3–11, 2010.
            51. SHIMABUKURO, Y. E. et al. Monitoring land cover in Acre State, western Brazilian Amazonia, using multitemporal remote sensing data. International Journal of Image and Data Fusion, v. 1, n. 4, p. 325–335, 2010.
            52. SILVEIRA, J. M.; AZEVEDO-RAMOS, C. Effect of reduced-impact and conventional logging techniques on the lizard kentropyx calcarata (Teiidae) in the Eastern Amazon. Ecotropica, v. 16, n. 1, p. 1–14, 2010.
            53. SIMPSON, B. International involvement in preservation of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest: Context, constraints and scope. Asia Pacific Journal of Environmental Law, v. 13, n. 1, p. 39–59, 2010.
            54. SOARES-FILHO, B. et al. Role of Brazilian Amazon protected areas in climate change mitigation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v. 107, n. 24, p. 10821–10826, 2010.
            55. SOLBERG, S. et al. Estimating spruce and pine biomass with interferometric X-band SAR. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 114, n. 10, p. 2353–2360, 2010.
            56. WALKER, W. S. et al. Large-Area Classification and Mapping of Forest and Land Cover in the Brazilian Amazon: A Comparative Analysis of ALOS/PALSAR and Landsat Data Sources. IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, v. 3, n. 4, p. 594–604, 2010.
            57. WULDER, M. A. et al. Multiscale satellite and spatial information and analysis framework in support of a large-area forest monitoring and inventory update. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, v. 170, n. 1–4, p. 417–433, 2010.

               

              2009

              Voltar ao topo

              1. ACKERMAN, I. L. et al. Termite (Insecta: Isoptera) species composition in a primary rain forest and agroforests in central Amazonia. Biotropica, v. 41, n. 2, p. 226–233, 2009.
              2. ALVES, D. S. et al. The changing rates and patterns of deforestation and land use in Brazilian Amazonia. Geophysical Monograph Series, v. 186, p. 11–23, 2009.
              3. AMARAL, S.; D’ALGE, J. C. L. Spatial data availability and its implications for sustainable development of the Brazilian Amazon. Earth Science Informatics, v. 2, n. 4, p. 193–203, 2009.
              4. ASNER, G. P. et al. A contemporary assessment of change in humid tropical forests. Conservation Biology, v. 23, n. 6, p. 1386–1395, 2009.
              5. BANERJEE, O.; ALAVALAPATI, J. A computable general equilibrium analysis of forest concessions in Brazil. Forest Policy and Economics, v. 11, n. 4, p. 244–252, 2009.
              6. BANERJEE, O.; MACPHERSON, A. J.; ALAVALAPATI, J. Toward a policy of sustainable forest management in Brazil: A historical analysis. Journal of Environment and Development, v. 18, n. 2, p. 130–153, 2009.
              7. BARCELLOS, C. et al. Mudanças climáticas e ambientais e as doenças infecciosas: cenários e incertezas para o Brasil. Epidemiologia e Serviços de Saúde, v. 18, n. 3, p. 285–304, 2009.
              8. BARRETT, K.; ROGAN, J.; EASTMAN, J. R. A case study of carbon fluxes from land change in the Southwest Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Land Use Science, v. 4, n. 4, p. 233–248, 2009.
              9. BAUCH, S. et al. Forest policy reform in Brazil. Journal of Forestry, v. 107, n. 3, p. 132–138, 2009.
              10. BRANCIFORTI, M. C. et al. Wood polymer composites technology supporting the recovery and protection of tropical forests: The amazonian phoenix project. Sustainability, v. 1, n. 4, p. 1431–1443, 2009.
              11. BROICH, M. et al. A comparison of sampling designs for estimating deforestation from Landsat imagery: A case study of the Brazilian Legal Amazon. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 113, n. 11, p. 2448–2454, 2009.
              12. BRONDÍZIO, E. S. et al. Small farmers and deforestation in Amazonia. Geophysical Monograph Series, v. 186, p. 117–143, 2009.
              13. CARDOSO, M. et al. Long-term potential for tropical-forest degradation due to deforestation and fires in the Brazilian Amazon. Biologia, v. 64, n. 3, p. 433–437, 2009.
              14. CAVIGLIA-HARRIS, J. L. et al. Modeling land use and land cover change in an Amazonian frontier settlement: Strategies for addressing population change and panel attrition. Journal of Land Use Science, v. 4, n. 4, p. 275–307, 2009.
              15. CHAVES, J. et al. Nitrogen transformations in flowpaths leading from soils to streams in amazon forest and pasture. Ecosystems, v. 12, n. 6, p. 961–972, 2009.
              16. COCHRANE, M. A.; BARBER, C. P. Climate change, human land use and future fires in the Amazon. Global Change Biology, v. 15, n. 3, p. 601–612, 2009.
              17. DE FREITAS, C. M.; GIATTI, L. L. Environmental sustainability and health indicators in the Legal Amazonia, Brazil [Indicadores de sustentabilidade ambiental e de saúde na Amazônia Legal, Brasil]. Cadernos de Saude Publica, v. 25, n. 6, p. 1251–1266, 2009.
              18. DE OLIVEIRA, T. G. Distribution, habitat utilization and conservation of the vulnerable bush dog speothos venaticus in northern Brazil. ORYX, v. 43, n. 2, p. 247–253, 2009.
              19. DUCEY, M. J. et al. Biomass equations for forest regrowth in the eastern Amazon using randomized branch sampling [Equações alométricas para estimativa de biomassa de floresta secundária na Amazônia Oriental usando amostragem aleatória de ramos]. Acta Amazonica, v. 39, n. 2, p. 349–360, 2009.
              20. FEARNSIDE, P. M. Global warming in amazonia: Impacts and Mitigation [Aquecimento global na Amazônia: Impactos e Mitigação]. Acta Amazonica, v. 39, n. 4, p. 1003–1011, 2009a.
              21. FEARNSIDE, P. M. et al. Biomass and greenhouse-gas emissions from land-use change in Brazil’s Amazonian “arc of deforestation”: The states of Mato Grosso and Rondônia. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 258, n. 9, p. 1968–1978, 2009.
              22. FEARNSIDE, P. M. A vulnerabilidade da floresta amazônica perante as mudanças climáticas. Oecologia Brasiliensis, v. 13, n. 4, p. 609–618, 2009.
              23. FERRAZ, S. F. D. B.; VETTORAZZI, C. A.; THEOBALD, D. M. Using indicators of deforestation and land-use dynamics to support conservation strategies: A case study of central Rondônia, Brazil. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 257, n. 7, p. 1586–1595, 2009.
              24. FRIBERG, L. Varieties of carbon governance: The clean development mechanism in Brazil-a success story challenged. Journal of Environment and Development, v. 18, n. 4, p. 395–424, 2009.
              25. HANSEN, M. C. et al. Quantifying changes in the rates of forest clearing in Indonesia from 1990 to 2005 using remotely sensed data sets. Environmental Research Letters, v. 4, n. 3, 2009.
              26. KAWAKUBO, F. S. et al. Land-use and vegetation-cover mapping of an indigenous land area in the state of Mato Grosso (Brazil) based on spectral linear mixing model, segmentation and region classification. Geocarto International, v. 24, n. 2, p. 165–175, abr. 2009.
              27. LARANJEIRAS, T. O.; COHN-HAFT, M. Where is the symbol of Brazilian Ornithology? The geographic distribution of the Golden Parakeet (Guarouba guarouba - Psittacidae) [Onde está o símbolo da ornitologia brasileira? a distribuição geográfica da ararajuba (guarouba guarouba - psittacidae)]. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, v. 17, n. 1, p. 1–19, 2009.
              28. LE QUÉRÉ, C. et al. Trends in the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide. Nature Geoscience, v. 2, n. 12, p. 831–836, 2009.
              29. LISKA, A. J.; PERRIN, R. K. Indirect land use emissions in the life cycle of biofuels: Regulations vs science. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, v. 3, n. 3, p. 318–328, 2009.
              30. LOARIE, S. R.; ASNER, G. P.; FIELD, C. B. Boosted carbon emissions from Amazon deforestation. Geophysical Research Letters, v. 36, n. 14, 2009.
              31. LONGO, K. M. et al. Biomass burning in Amazonia: Emissions, long-range transport of smoke and its regional and remote impacts. Geophysical Monograph Series, v. 186, p. 207–232, 2009.
              32. LUIZÃO, F. J. et al. The maintenance of soil Fertility in Amazonian managed systems. Geophysical Monograph Series, v. 186, p. 311–336, 2009.
              33. MACHADO, L. O. R. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: Colective action, governance and governability in boundary areas [Desflorestamento na amazônia brasileira: Ação coletiva, governança e governabilidade em área de fronteira]. Sociedade e Estado, v. 24, n. 1, p. 115–147, 2009.
              34. MAEDA, E. E. et al. Predicting forest fire in the Brazilian Amazon using MODIS imagery and artificial neural networks. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, v. 11, n. 4, p. 265–272, 2009a.
              35. MAEDA, E. E. et al. Impacts of agricultural expansion on surface runoff: A case study of a River basin in the Brazilian Legal Amazon. International Journal of Geoinformatics, v. 5, n. 3, p. 33–41, 2009b.
              36. MALDONADO, F. et al. Modelagem de desmatamento e emissões de gases de efeito estufa na região sob influência da Rodovia Manaus-Porto Velho (BR-319). Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia, v.24, p. 208-233, 2009.
              37. MARCELINO, E. V.; FORMAGGIO, A. R.; MAEDA, E. E. Landslide inventory using image fusion techniques in Brazil. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, v. 11, n. 3, p. 181–191, 2009.
              38. MCALPINE, C. A. et al. Increasing world consumption of beef as a driver of regional and global change: A call for policy action based on evidence from Queensland (Australia), Colombia and Brazil. Global Environmental Change, v. 19, n. 1, p. 21–33, 2009.
              39. MERLIN PATRICIA GRUESO, M.; GÓMEZ, J. H.; GARAY, L. Formulation and control of the strategy in a group of companies that shape a network [Formulación y control de la estrategia en un grupo de empresas que conforman una red]. Journal of Technology Management and Innovation, v. 4, n. 4, p. 130–138, 2009.
              40. MOREIRA, E. et al. Dynamical coupling of multiscale land change models. Landscape Ecology, v. 24, n. 9, p. 1183–1194, 2009.
              41. MUYLAERT DE ARAÚJO, M. S.; SILVA, C.; CAMPOS, C. P. DE. Land use change sector contribution to the carbon historical emissions and the sustainability—Case study of the Brazilian Legal Amazon. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, v. 13, n. 3, p. 696–702, abr. 2009.
              42. NOBRE, C. A.; BORMA, L. D. S. “Tipping points” for the Amazon forest. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, v. 1, n. 1, p. 28–36, 2009.
              43. NUMATA, I. et al. Determining dynamics of spatial and temporal structures of forest edges in South Western Amazonia. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 258, n. 11, p. 2547–2555, 2009.
              44. PACHECO, P. Agrarian change, cattle ranching and deforestation: Assessing their linkages in southern Pará. Environment and History, v. 15, n. 4, p. 493–520, 2009.
              45. PATTANAYAK, S. K. et al. Climate change and conservation in Brazil: CGE evaluation of health and wealth impacts. B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy, v. 9, n. 2, 2009.
              46. POTTER, C.; KLOOSTER, S.; GENOVESE, V. Carbon emissions from deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon Region. Biogeosciences, v. 6, n. 11, p. 2369–2381, 2009.
              47. PRATES, R. C.; SERRA, M. O impacto dos gastos do governo federal no desmatamento no Estado do Pará. Nova Economia, v. 19, n. 1, p. 95–116, 2009.
              48. PRATES-CLARK, C. D. C.; LUCAS, R. M.; DOS SANTOS, J. R. Implications of land-use history for forest regeneration in the Brazilian Amazon. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 35, n. 6, p. 534–553, 2009.
              49. RIVERO, S. et al. Pecuária e desmatamento: Uma análise das principais causas diretas do desmatamento na Amazônia. Nova Economia, v. 19, n. 1, p. 41–66, 2009.
              50. RODRIGUES, A. S. L. et al. Boom-and-bust development patterns across the amazon deforestation frontier. Science, v. 324, n. 5933, p. 1435–1437, 2009.
              51. SAWYER, D. Carbon flows in the Amazon and cerrado biomes: A socioecosystemic view [Fluxos de carbono na Amazônia e no cerrado: Um olhar socioecossistêmico]. Sociedade e Estado, v. 24, n. 1, p. 149–171, 2009.
              52. SEEHUSEN, S. E. Can payments for ecosystem services contribute to sustainable development in the Brazilian Amazon? Folia Forestalia Polonica, Series A, v. 51, n. 1, p. 91–119, 2009.
              53. SIRÉN, A. H.; BRONDIZIO, E. S. Detecting subtle land use change in tropical forests. Applied Geography, v. 29, n. 2, p. 201–211, 2009.
              54. SOARES NETO, T. G. et al. Biomass consumption and CO<inf>2</inf>, CO and main hydrocarbon gas emissions in an Amazonian forest clearing fire. Atmospheric Environment, v. 43, n. 2, p. 438–446, 2009.
              55. SORRENSEN, C. Potential hazards of land policy: Conservation, rural development and fire use in the Brazilian Amazon. Land Use Policy, v. 26, n. 3, p. 782–791, 2009.
              56. SOUZA JR., C. M. et al. Web-oriented GIS system for monitoring, conservation and law enforcement of the Brazilian Amazon. Earth Science Informatics, v. 2, n. 4, p. 205–215, 2009.
              57. STEININGER, M. K.; GODOY, F.; HARPER, G. Effects of systematic sampling on satellite estimates of deforestation rates. Environmental Research Letters, v. 4, n. 3, 2009.
              58. TRANCOSO, R. et al. Deforestation and conservation in major watersheds of the Brazilian Amazon. Environmental Conservation, v. 36, n. 4, p. 277–288, 2009.
              59. VALE, M. M.; ALVES, M. A. S.; LORINI, M. L. Climate change: Challenges and opportunities for biodiversity conservation in Brazil [Mudanças climáticas: Desafios e oportunidades para a conservação da biodiversidade Brasileira]. Oecologia Brasiliensis, v. 13, n. 3, p. 518–535, 2009.
              60. VAN DER WERF, G. R. et al. Estimates of fire emissions from an active deforestation region in the southern Amazon based on satellite data and biogeochemical modelling. Biogeosciences, v. 6, n. 2, p. 235–249, 2009.
              61. WALKER, R. et al. Protecting the Amazon with protected areas. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v. 106, n. 26, p. 10582–10586, 2009.
              62. ZAKS, D. P. M. et al. Producer and consumer responsibility for greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural production - a perspective from the Brazilian Amazon. Environmental Research Letters, v. 4, n. 4, 2009.

                2008

                Voltar ao topo

                1. ARAGÃO, L. E. O. C. et al. Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian Amazonia. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, v. 363, n. 1498, p. 1779–1785, 2008.
                2. BALCH, J. R. K. et al. Negative fire feedback in a transitional forest of southeastern Amazonia. Global Change Biology, v. 14, n. 10, p. 2276–2287, 2008.
                3. BONTEMPS, S. et al. An object-based change detection method accounting for temporal dependences in time series with medium to coarse spatial resolution. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 112, n. 6, p. 3181–3191, 2008.
                4. BRNER, J.; WUNDER, S. Paying for avoided deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: from cost assessment to scheme design. International Forestry Review, v. 10, n. 3, p. 496–511, 1 set. 2008.
                5. CHAVES, J. et al. Land management impacts on runoff sources in small Amazon watersheds. Hydrological Processes, v. 22, n. 12, p. 1766–1775, 2008.
                6. COCHRANE, M. A.; LAURANCE, W. F. Synergisms among fire, land use, and climate change in the Amazon. Ambio, v. 37, n. 7–8, p. 522–527, 2008.
                7. DE CARVALHO XIMENES, A. et al. Dynamic deforestation modeling in the Amazon [Modelagem dinâmica do desmatamento na Amazônia]. Boletim de Ciencias Geodesicas, v. 14, n. 3, p. 370–391, 2008.
                8. DE SOUZA, C. R. et al. Efficiency of forest species for multiple use in Amazonia [Desempenho de espécies florestais para uso múltiplo na Amazônia]. Scientia Forestalis/Forest Sciences, n. 77, p. 7–14, 2008.
                9. DEFRIES, R. Terrestrial vegetation in the coupled human-earth system: Contributions of remote sensing. Annual Review of Environment and Resources, v. 33, p. 369–390, 2008.
                10. DÍAZ-GALLEGOS, J. R.; MAS, J.-F.; MONTES, A. V. Monitoring deforestation patterns in the mesoamerican biological Corridor, Mexico [Monitero de los patrones de deforestación en el corredor biólogico Mesoamericano, México]. Interciencia, v. 33, n. 12, p. 882–890, 2008.
                11. DUBREUIL, V. et al. Amazonian landscapes and pioneer fronts monitored by remote sensing: The case of Mato Grosso [Paysages et fronts pionniers amazoniens sous le regard des satellites: L’exemple du Mato Grosso]. Espace Geographique, v. 37, n. 1, p. 57–74, 2008.
                12. FREITAS, C. D. C. et al. Land use and land cover mapping in the Brazilian amazon using polarimetrie airborne P-band SAR data. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, v. 46, n. 10, p. 2956–2970, 2008.
                13. GARCÍA, J. J. S.; FONTES, J. F. G.; VEGA, J. L. A. Faculty participation in planning activities and it’s relationship with their vision of the institution. Revista Electronica de Investigacion Educativa, v. 10, n. 2, 2008.
                14. GOLDEMBERG, J. The challenge of biofuels. Energy and Environmental Science, v. 1, n. 5, p. 523–525, 2008.
                15. GONÇALVES, F. G.; DOS SANTOS, J. R. Floristic composition and structure of a sustainable forest management unit at Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil [Composição florística e estrutura de uma unidade de manejo florestal sustentável na Floresta Nacional do Tapajós, Pará]. Acta Amazonica, v. 38, n. 2, p. 229–244, 2008.
                16. HANSEN, M. C. et al. Comparing annual MODIS and PRODES forest cover change data for advancing monitoring of Brazilian forest cover. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 112, n. 10, p. 3784–3793, 2008.
                17. JUÁREZ, N. R. I. et al. An empirical approach to retrieving monthly evapotranspiration over Amazonia. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 29, n. 24, p. 7045–7063, dez. 2008.
                18. LEES, A. C.; PERES, C. A. Avian life-history determinants of local extinction risk in a hyper-fragmented neotropical forest landscape. Animal Conservation, v. 11, n. 2, p. 128–137, 2008a.
                19. LEES, A. C.; PERES, C. A. Conservation value of remnant riparian forest corridors of varying quality for Amazonian birds and mammals. Conservation Biology, v. 22, n. 2, p. 439–449, 2008b.
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                21. MORTON, D. C. et al. Agricultural intensification increases deforestation fire activity in Amazonia. Global Change Biology, v. 14, n. 10, p. 2262–2275, 2008.
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                23. NORRIS, D. et al. Terrestrial mammal responses to edges in Amazonian forest patches: A study based on track stations. Mammalia, v. 72, n. 1, p. 15–23, 2008.
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                26. SCOUVART, M. et al. Causes of deforestation in the Brazilian amazon: A qualitative comparative analysis. Journal of Land Use Science, v. 2, n. 4, p. 257–282, 2008.
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                28. STEININGER, M. K. et al. Convincing evidence of tropical forest decline. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, v. 105, n. 24, 2008.
                29. THOMAS, F. et al. Comparative analysis of Andiodrilus pachoensis casts in forests and pastures of South-Eastern Amazon (Brazil). European Journal of Soil Biology, v. 44, n. 5–6, p. 545–553, 2008.
                30. VALE, M. M. et al. Effects of future infrastructure development on threat status and occurrence of Amazonian birds. Conservation Biology, v. 22, n. 4, p. 1006–1015, 2008.
                31. VERA-DIAZ, M. D. C. et al. An interdisciplinary model of soybean yield in the Amazon Basin: The climatic, edaphic, and economic determinants. Ecological Economics, v. 65, n. 2, p. 420–431, 2008.
                32. VIRTANEN, P. K. Los procesos de modernización en la Amazonia brasileña: Lógicas sociales de los pueblos indígenas y la interacción entre campos sociales. Sociológica (México), v. 23, n. 67, p. 51–80, 2008.

                   

                  2007

                  Voltar ao topo

                  1. ACHARD, F. et al. Pan-tropical monitoring of deforestation. Environmental Research Letters, v. 2, n. 4, 2007.
                  2. BRICEÑO-LEÓN, R. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon. Cadernos de Saude Publica, v. 23, n. SUPPL. 1, p. S33–S40, 2007.
                  3. CALDAS, M. et al. Theorizing land cover and land use change: The peasant economy of Amazonian deforestation. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, v. 97, n. 1, p. 86–110, 2007.
                  4. CERRI, C. E. P. et al. Tropical agriculture and global warming: Impacts and mitigation options. Scientia Agricola, v. 64, n. 1, p. 83–99, 2007.
                  5. CHRISTIAN, T. J. et al. The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: Trace gases emitted by smoldering logs and dung from deforestation and pasture fires in Brazil. Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 112, n. D18, p. D18308, 26 set. 2007.
                  6. D’ALMEIDA, C. et al. The effects of deforestation on the hydrological cycle in Amazonia: A review on scale and resolution. International Journal of Climatology, v. 27, n. 5, p. 633–647, 2007.
                  7. DAVIDSON, E. A. et al. Recuperation of nitrogen cycling in Amazonian forests following agricultural abandonment. Nature, v. 447, n. 7147, p. 995–998, 2007.
                  8. FERREIRA, M. E. et al. Spectral linear mixture modelling approaches for land cover mapping of tropical savanna areas in Brazil. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 28, n. 2, p. 413–429, 2007a.
                  9. FERREIRA, N. C. et al. An operational deforestation mapping system using MODIS data and spatial context analysis. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 28, n. 1, p. 47–62, 2007b.
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                  11. GARCIA, R. A.; SOARES-FILHO, B. S.; SAWYER, D. O. Socioeconomic dimensions, migration, and deforestation: An integrated model of territorial organization for the Brazilian Amazon. Ecological Indicators, v. 7, n. 3, p. 719–730, jul. 2007.
                  12. KILLEEN, T. J. et al. Thirty years of land-cover change in Bolivia. Ambio, v. 36, n. 7, p. 600–606, 2007.
                  13. KINTISCH, E. CARBON EMISSIONS: Improved Monitoring of Rainforests Helps Pierce Haze of Deforestation. Science, v. 316, n. 5824, p. 536–537, 27 abr. 2007.
                  14. LATORRE, M. L. et al. Integration of multiresolutions remote sensing data for representation of the land cover using vegetation continuous fields and the decision tree classification [Integração de dados de sensoriamento remoto multi resoluções para a representação da cobertura da terra utilizando campos contínuos de vegetação e classificação por árvores de decisão]. Revista Brasileira de Geofisica, v. 25, n. 1, p. 63–74, 2007.
                  15. MICHALSKI, F.; NISHI, I.; PERES, C. A. Disturbance-mediated drift in tree functional groups in Amazonian forest fragments. Biotropica, v. 39, n. 6, p. 691–701, 2007.
                  16. MOLLICONE, D. et al. An incentive mechanism for reducing emissions from conversion of intact and non-intact forests. Climatic Change, v. 83, n. 4, p. 477–493, 2007.
                  17. MOORE, N. et al. Uncertainty and the changing hydroclimatology of the Amazon. Geophysical Research Letters, v. 34, n. 14, 24 jul. 2007.
                  18. PERSSON, U. M.; AZAR, C. Tropical deforestation in a future international climate policy regime - Lessons from the Brazilian Amazon. Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, v. 12, n. 7, p. 1277–1304, 2007.
                  19. PERZ, S. G. Grand theory and context-specificity in the study of forest dynamics: Forest transition theory and other directions. Professional Geographer, v. 59, n. 1, p. 105–114, 2007.
                  20. PERZ, S. G. et al. Unofficial road building in the Brazilian Amazon: Dilemmas and models for road governance. Environmental Conservation, v. 34, n. 2, p. 112–121, 2007.
                  21. RAMANKUTTY, N. et al. Challenges to estimating carbon emissions from tropical deforestation. Global Change Biology, v. 13, n. 1, p. 51–66, 2007.
                  22. RODRÍGUEZ, J. P.; BALCH, J. K.; RODRÍGUEZ-CLARK, K. M. Assessing extinction risk in the absence of species-level data: Quantitative criteria for terrestrial ecosystems. Biodiversity and Conservation, v. 16, n. 1, p. 183–209, 2007.

                     

                    2006

                    Voltar ao topo

                    1. ALDRICH, S. P. et al. Land-cover and land-use change in the Brazilian Amazon: Smallholders, ranchers, and frontier stratification. Economic Geography, v. 82, n. 3, p. 265–288, 2006.
                    2. AMARAL, S. et al. DMSP/OLS night-time light imagery for urban population estimates in the Brazilian Amazon. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 27, n. 5, p. 855–870, 2006.
                    3. AZEVEDO-RAMOS, C. et al. Integrating ecosystem management, protected areas, and mammal conservation in the Brazilian Amazon. Ecology and Society, v. 11, n. 2, 2006.
                    4. BRANDÃO JR., A. O.; SOUZA JR., C. M. Mapping unofficial roads with Landsat images: A new tool to improve the monitoring of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 27, n. 1, p. 177–189, 2006.
                    5. CARREIRAS, J. M. B.; PEREIRA, J. M. C.; SHIMABUKURO, Y. E. Land-cover mapping in the Brazilian Amazon using SPOT-4 vegetation data and machine learning classification methods. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, v. 72, n. 8, p. 897–910, 2006.
                    6. D’ALMEIDA, C. et al. A water balance model to study the hydrological response to different scenarios of deforestation in Amazonia. Journal of Hydrology, v. 331, n. 1–2, p. 125–136, nov. 2006.
                    7. D’ANTONA, Á. O.; VANWEY, L. K.; HAYASHI, C. M. Property size and land cover change in the Brazilian Amazon. Population and Environment, v. 27, n. 5–6, p. 373–396, 2006.
                    8. DE FILHO, F. J. B. O.; METZGER, J. P. Thresholds in landscape structure for three common deforestation patterns in the Brazilian Amazon. Landscape Ecology, v. 21, n. 7, p. 1061–1073, out. 2006.
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                    11. FERRAZ, S. F. DE B.; SILVA ALMEIDA CANTEIRO CAPÃO, L. M.; VETTORAZZI, C. A. Temporal scale and spatial resolution effects on Amazon forest fragmentation assessment in Rondônia. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 27, n. 3, p. 459–472, 2006.
                    12. FILOSO, S. et al. Human activities changing the nitrogen cycle in Brazil. Biogeochemistry, v. 79, n. 1–2, p. 61–89, 2006.
                    13. KIRBY, K. R. et al. The future of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Futures, v. 38, n. 4, p. 432–453, maio 2006.
                    14. MARTINELLI, L. A. et al. Sources of reactive nitrogen affecting ecosystems in Latin America and the Caribbean: Current trends and future perspectives. Biogeochemistry, v. 79, n. 1–2, p. 3–24, 2006.
                    15. MEINE, C.; SOULÉ, M.; NOSS, R. F. “A mission-driven discipline”: The growth of conservation biology. Conservation Biology, v. 20, n. 3, p. 631–651, 2006.
                    16. MORTON, D. C. et al. Cropland expansion changes deforestation dynamics in the southern Brazilian Amazon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, v. 103, n. 39, p. 14637–14641, 26 set. 2006.
                    17. NEEFF, T. et al. Area and age of secondary forests in Brazilian Amazonia 1978-2002: An empirical estimate. Ecosystems, v. 9, n. 4, p. 609–623, 2006.
                    18. NEILL, C. et al. Soil solution nitrogen losses during clearing of lowland Amazon forest for pasture. Plant and Soil, v. 281, n. 1–2, p. 233–245, 2006.
                    19. NEPSTAD, D. et al. Inhibition of Amazon deforestation and fire by parks and indigenous lands. Conservation Biology, v. 20, n. 1, p. 65–73, 2006.
                    20. NEPSTAD, D. C.; STICKLER, C. M.; ALMEIDA, O. T. Globalization of the Amazon soy and beef industries: Opportunities for conservation. Conservation Biology, v. 20, n. 6, p. 1595–1603, 2006.
                    21. PERZ, S. G.; WALKER, R. T.; CALDAS, M. M. Beyond population and environment: Household demographic life cycles and land use allocation among small farms in the Amazon. Human Ecology, v. 34, n. 6, p. 829–849, 2006.
                    22. RAMOS DA SILVA, R.; AVISSAR, R. The Hydrometeorology of a Deforested Region of the Amazon Basin. Journal of Hydrometeorology, v. 7, n. 5, p. 1028–1042, out. 2006.
                    23. SCOUVART, M.; LAMBIN, É. F. A systemic approach to the causes of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: Syndromes, synergies and feedbacks [Approche systémique des causes de la déforestation en Amazonie brésilienne: Syndromes, synergies et rétroactions]. Espace Geographique, v. 35, n. 3, p. 241–254, 2006.

                    2005

                    Voltar ao topo

                    1. ALMEIDA-FILHO, R. et al. Evaluation and Perspectives of Using Multitemporal L-Band SAR Data to Monitor Deforestation in the Brazilian AmazÔnia.,IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, v. 2, n. 4, p. 409–412, out. 2005.
                    2. ANDERSON, L. O. et al. Assessment of deforestation in near real time over the Brazilian amazon using multitemporal fraction images derived from terra MODIS. IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, v. 2, n. 3, p. 315–318, 2005.
                    3. ASNER, G. P. et al. Ecology: Selective logging in the Brazilian Amazon. Science, v. 310, n. 5747, p. 480–482, 2005.
                    4. BARBOSA, R. I.; FEARNSIDE, P. M. Above-ground biomass and the fate of carbon after burning in the savannas of Roraima, Brazilian Amazonia. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 216, n. 1–3, p. 295–316, 2005.
                    5. BONAUDO, T. et al. The effects of deforestation on wildlife along the transamazon highway. European Journal of Wildlife Research, v. 51, n. 3, p. 199–206, 2005.
                    6. CAMARA, G. Amazonian Deforestation Models. Science, v. 307, n. 5712, p. 1043c–1044c, 18 fev. 2005.
                    7. DE BARROS FERRAZ, S. F. et al. Landscape dynamics of Amazonian deforestation between 1984 and 2002 in central Rondônia, Brazil: Assessment and future scenarios. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 204, n. 1, p. 69–85, 2005.
                    8. KASA, S.; NÆSS, L. O. Financial crisis and state-NGO relations: The case of Brazilian Amazonia, 1998-2000. Society and Natural Resources, v. 18, n. 9, p. 791–804, 2005.
                    9. MAGARELLI, G.; FOSTIER, A. H. Influence of deforestation on the mercury air/soil exchange in the Negro River Basin, Amazon. Atmospheric Environment, v. 39, n. 39 SPEC. ISS., p. 7518–7528, 2005.
                    10. MATRICARDI, E. A. T. et al. Monitoring selective logging in tropical evergreen forests using Landsat: Multitemporal regional analyses in Mato Grosso, Brazil. Earth Interactions, v. 9, n. 1, 2005.
                    11. MORTON, D. C. et al. Rapid Assessment of Annual Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon Using MODIS Data. Earth Interactions, v. 9, n. 8, p. 1–22, jun. 2005.
                    12. NEEFF, T. et al. Carbon budget estimation in Central Amazonia: Successional forest modeling from remote sensing data. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 94, n. 4, p. 508–522, fev. 2005.
                    13. PEDLOWSKI, M. A. et al. Conservation units: A new deforestation frontier in the Amazonian state of Rondônia, Brazil. Environmental Conservation, v. 32, n. 2, p. 149–155, 2005.
                    14. PERES, C. A. Why we need megareserves in Amazonia. Conservation Biology, v. 19, n. 3, p. 728–733, 2005.
                    15. PERZ, S. G.; ARAMBURÚ, C.; BREMNER, J. Population, Land Use and Deforestation in the Pan Amazon Basin: a Comparison of Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Perú and Venezuela. Environment, Development and Sustainability, v. 7, n. 1, p. 23–49, jan. 2005.
                    16. PORRO, R.; SERRÃO, A.; CORNELIUS, J. P. The Amazon Initiative: A multidisciplinary, international consortium for prevention, mitigation and reduction of resource degradation. Forestry Chronicle, v. 81, n. 3, p. 337–341, 2005.
                    17. SANTILLI, M. et al. Tropical deforestation and the Kyoto protocol. Climatic Change, v. 71, n. 3, p. 267–276, 2005.
                    18. SIMON, M. F.; GARAGORRY, F. L. The expansion of agriculture in the Brazilian Amazon. Environmental Conservation, v. 32, n. 3, p. 203–212, 2005.
                    19. SOUZA, C. M.; ROBERTS, D. Mapping forest degradation in the Amazon region with Ikonos images. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 26, n. 3, p. 425–429, fev. 2005.
                    20. VIEIRA, I. C. G.; SILVA, J. M. C. DA; TOLEDO, P. M. DE. Estratégias para evitar a perda de biodiversidade na Amazônia. Estudos Avançados, v. 19, n. 54, p. 153–164, ago. 2005.
                    21. ZARIN, D. J. et al. Legacy of fire slows carbon accumulation in Amazonian forest regrowth. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, v. 3, n. 7, p. 365–369, 2005.

                    2004

                    Voltar ao topo

                    1. BIGGS, T. W.; DUNNE, T.; MARTINELLI, L. A. Natural controls and human impacts on stream nutrient concentrations in a deforested region of the Brazilian Amazon basin. Biogeochemistry, v. 68, n. 2, p. 227–257, abr. 2004.
                    2. BROWDER, J. O.; PEDLOWSKI, M. A.; SUMMERS, P. M. Land use patterns in the Brazilian Amazon: Comparative farm-level evidence from Rondônia. Human Ecology, v. 32, n. 2, p. 197–224, 2004.
                    3. CARVALHO, G. et al. An amazon perspective on the forest-climate connection: Opportunity for climate mitigation, conservation and development? Environment, Development and Sustainability, v. 6, n. 1–2, p. 163–174, 2004.
                    4. CHAGNON, F. J. F. Climatic shift in patterns of shallow clouds over the Amazon. Geophysical Research Letters, v. 31, n. 24, 2004.
                    5. CUNHA DA COSTA, R. Potential for producing bio-fuel in the Amazon deforested areas. Biomass and Bioenergy, v. 26, n. 5, p. 405–415, 2004.
                    6. DAVIDSON, E. A.; ARTAXO, P. Globally significant changes in biological processes of the Amazon Basin: Results of the large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment. Global Change Biology, v. 10, n. 5, p. 519–529, 2004.
                    7. FEARNSIDE, P. M.; BARBOSA, R. I. Accelerating deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: Towards answering open questions. Environmental Conservation, v. 31, n. 1, p. 7–10, 2004.
                    8. HIRSCH, A. I. et al. The net carbon flux due to deforestation and forest re-growth in the Brazilian Amazon: analysis using a process-based model. Global Change Biology, v. 10, n. 5, p. 908–924, maio 2004.
                    9. HOLMES, K. W. et al. Soil databases and the problem of establishing regional biogeochemical trends. Global Change Biology, v. 10, n. 5, p. 796–814, 2004.
                    10. KAWAKUBO, F. S. et al. Current characterization of land cover of “Terra Indigena” (Indegenous Land) Sangradouro/Volta Grande-Mato Grosso, Brazil [Caracterizaçäo atual do uso da terra e da cobertura vegetal na região da terra indígena Sangradouro/Volta Grande-Mato Grosso, Brasil]. Investigaciones Geograficas, v. 53, p. 27–38, 2004.
                    11. LAURANCE, W. F. Deforestation in Amazonia. Science, v. 304, n. 5674, p. 1109b–1111b, 21 maio 2004.
                    12. LE TOURNEAU, F.-M. To the end of the forest? Causes and mechanisms of deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia [Jusqu’au bout de la forêt? Causes et mécanismes de la déforestation en Amazonie brésilienne]. Mappemonde, v. 75, n. 3, 2004.
                    13. POWELL, R. L. et al. Sources of error in accuracy assessment of thematic land-cover maps in the Brazilian Amazon. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 90, n. 2, p. 221–234, 2004.

                      2003

                      Voltar ao topo

                      1. DURIEUX, L. The impact of deforestation on cloud cover over the Amazon arc of deforestation. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 86, n. 1, p. 132–140, 30 jun. 2003.
                      2. EVA, H. D. Response to Comment on “Determination of Deforestation Rates of the World’s Humid Tropical Forests”. Science, v. 299, n. 5609, p. 1015b–11015, 14 fev. 2003.
                      3. FEARNSIDE, P. M. Deforestation Control in Mato Grosso: A New Model for Slowing the Loss of Brazil’s Amazon Forest. AMBIO: A Journal of the Human Environment, v. 32, n. 5, p. 343–345, ago. 2003.
                      4. NUMATA, I. Relationships among soil fertility dynamics and remotely sensed measures across pasture chronosequences in Rondônia, Brazil. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 87, n. 4, p. 446–455, 15 nov.2003.
                      5. RUEDA, B. L. et al. Production and economic potentials of cattle in pasture-based systems of the western Amazon region of Brazil. Journal of Animal Science, v. 81, n. 12, p. 2923–2937, 2003.
                      6. SOUZA, C. Mapping forest degradation in the Eastern Amazon from SPOT 4 through spectral mixture models. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 87, n. 4, p. 494–506, 15 nov. 2003.

                        2002

                        Voltar ao topo

                        1. ALVES, D. S. Space-time dynamics of deforestation in Brazilian Amazônia. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 23, n. 14, p. 2903–2908, jan. 2002.
                        2. CARVALHO, G. O. et al. Frontier expansion in the Amazon: Balancing development and sustainability. Environment, v. 44, n. 3, p. 34–45, 2002.
                        3. ENGLE, F. C. Deforestation and Development in Brazil’s Amazon Basin. Geocarto International, v. 15, n. 1, p. 84–87, mar. 2000.
                        4. LAURANCE, W. F. et al. Predictors of deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Biogeography, v. 29, n. 5–6, p. 737–748, maio 2002.
                        5. MARTINI, P. R. Regional cooperation through space technology: Basis for a South America space agency. Acta Astronautica, v. 51, n. 1–9, p. 559–567, jul. 2002.
                        6. SGRENZAROLI, M. et al. Contextual clustering for image labeling: An application to degraded forest assessment in landsat TM images of the Brazilian Amazon. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, v. 40, n. 8, p. 1833–1848, 2002a.
                        7. SGRENZAROLI, M. et al. Tropical forest cover monitoring: Estimates from the GRFM JERS-1 radar mosaics using wavelet zooming techniques and validation. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 23, n. 7, p. 1329–1355, 2002b.
                        8. STEUDLER, P. A. et al. Trace gas responses of tropical forest and pasture soils to N and P fertilization. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v. 16, n. 2, p. 7–1, 2002.

                          2001

                          Voltar ao topo

                          1. ASNER, G. P. Cloud cover in Landsat observations of the Brazilian Amazon. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 22, n. 18, p. 3855–3862, jan. 2001.
                          2. CIARDELLI, G.; RANIERI, N. The treatment and reuse of wastewater in the textile industry by means of ozonation and electroflocculation. Water Research, v. 35, n. 2, p. 567–572, 2001.
                          3. LAURANCE, W. F.; ALBERNAZ, A. K. M.; COSTA, C. D. Is deforestation accelerating in the Brazilian Amazon? Environmental Conservation, v. 28, n. 04, dez. 2001.
                          4. METZGER, J. P. Effects of deforestation pattern and private nature reserves on the forest conservation in settlement areas of the Brazilian Amazon. Biota Neotropica, v. 1, n. 1–2, p. 1–14, 2001.
                          5. NEPSTAD, D. et al. Road paving, fire regime feedbacks, and the future of Amazon forests. Forest Ecology and Management, v. 154, n. 3, p. 395–407, dez. 2001.
                          6. PANTUZZO, A. E.; SOARES-FILHO, B. S.; ASSUNÇÃO, R. M. Modeling the Spatial Transition Probabilities of Landscape Dynamics in an Amazonian Colonization Frontier: Transition probability maps indicate where changes may occur in the landscape, thus enabling better evaluation of the ecological consequences of landscape evolution. BioScience, v. 51, n. 12, p. 1059–1067, 2001.
                          7. POTTER, C. et al. Biomass burning losses of carbon estimated from ecosystem modeling and satellite data analysis for the Brazilian Amazon region. Atmospheric Environment, v. 35, n. 10, p. 1773–1781, abr. 2001.
                          8. SOARES-FILHO, B. S.; ASSUNCÃO, R. M.; PANTUZZO, A. E. Modeling the spatial transition probabilities of landscape dynamics in an Amazonian colonization frontier. BioScience, v. 51, n. 12, p. 1059–1067, 2001.

                            2000

                            Voltar ao topo

                            1. COSTA, M. H.; FOLEY, J. A. Combined effects of deforestation and doubled atmospheric CO<inf>2</inf> concentrations on the climate of Amazonia. Journal of Climate, v. 13, n. 1, p. 18–34, 2000.
                            2. FEARNSIDE, P. M. Global warming and tropical land-use change: Greenhouse gas emissions from biomass burning, decomposition and soils in forest conversion, shifting cultivation and secondary vegetation. Climatic Change, v. 46, n. 1–2, p. 115–158, 2000.
                            3. HOUGHTON, RICHARD A et al. Annual fluxes of carbon from deforestation and regrowth in the Brazilian Amazon. Nature, v. 403, n. 6767, p. 301, 2000.
                            4. LAURANCE, W. F.; VASCONCELOS, H. L.; LOVEJOY, T. E. Forest loss and fragmentation in the Amazon: implications for wildlife conservation. Oryx, v. 34, n. 1, p. 39–45, jan. 2000.
                            5. LAURANCE, WILLIAM F. Mega-Development Trends in the Amazon: Implications for Global Change. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, v. 66, n. 1, p. 113--122, 2000.
                            6. SIERRA, R. Dynamics and patterns of deforestation in the western Amazon: the Napo deforestation front, 1986–1996. Applied Geography, v. 20, n. 1, p. 1–16, jan. 2000.

                              1999

                              Voltar ao topo

                                1. GRELLE, C. E. D. V. et al. The question of scale in threat analysis: A case study with Brazilian mammals. Animal Conservation, v. 2, n. 2, p. 149–152, 1999.

                                 

                                1998

                                Voltar ao topo

                                  1. SHIMABUKURO, Y. E. et al. Using shade fraction image segmentation to evaluate deforestation in landsat thematic mapper images of the Amazon region. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 19, n. 3, p. 535–541, 1998.
                                  2. THELMA KRUG. Space Technology and Environmental Monitoring in Brazil. Journal of International Affairs, v. 51, n. 2, p. 655, 1998.

                                   

                                  1997

                                  Voltar ao topo

                                    1. ALVES, D. et al. Biomass of primary and secondary vegetation in Rondonia, Western Brazilian Amazon. Global Change Biology, v. 3, n. 5, p. 451–461, out. 1997.
                                    2. SAATCHI, S. S.; SOARES, J. V.; ALVES, D. S. Mapping deforestation and land use in Amazon rainforest using SIR-C imagery. Remote Sensing of Environment, v. 39, n. 2, p. 191–202, 1997.

                                    1996

                                    Voltar ao topo

                                      1. MANTOVANI, A. C. D. M; SETZER, A. W. Deforestation detection in the Amazon with an AVHRR-based system. International Journal of Remote Sensing, v. 18, n. 2, p. 273–286, 1996.

                                      1994

                                      Voltar ao topo

                                        1. BATISTA, G. T.; TUCKER, C. J. Assessment of AVHRR data for deforestation estimation in Mato Grosso (Amazon Basin). Remote Sensing Reviews, v. 10, n. 1–3, p. 35–50, 1994.

                                        1992

                                        Voltar ao topo

                                          1. ITTEN, K. I.; SPECTER, C. N.; SAUSEN, T. M. Basic considerations in development cooperation: the application of remote sensing in developing and newly industrialized countries. ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, v. 47, n. 4, p. 325–332, jun. 1992.
                                          2. SAUSEN, T. M.; DA CUNHA, R. P. Training for Amazonia deforestation assessment. IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, v. 11, n. 1, p. 30–31, 1992.

                                          1990

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                                            1. SHUKLA, J.; NOBRE, C. A.; SELLERS, P. Amazon deforestation and climate change. Science, v. 247, n. 4948, p. 1322–1325, 1990.